Panama 980 E282

Old School Tobacco Rolling – Pride of Panama

David Reynaga, originally from Los Angeles California, first came to Panama in 1995 as a system engineer working for the US government in the Panama Canal Zone. At the time, David purchased some land thinking about future investments. In 1999 David moved to the UK to continue providing system and communication services for the US government. Having invested […]

Read More...
DSC01064

Salt and Sugar Museum

Located in the agricultural town of Aguadulce (sweet water and/or fresh water) in the Coclé province. The production of sugar is one of the main activities of the region. Aguadulce is home to the largest sugar refinery in Panama, Azucarera Nacional, founded in 1911. The salt production in Aguadulce has been one of the oldest and more […]

Read More...
iStock_000002520336Medium

Panama La Vieja

UNESCO World Heritage Site, Panamá La Vieja, commonly known as Panamá Viejo, is the seat of the original Panama City, founded in 1519 by Pedro Arias de Dávila. This was the first Spanish settlement on the Pacific coast of the Americas. Located on the far eastern side of the current city, these ruins are all that remains of […]

Read More...
Panama 980 E26

The Myth of the Panama Hat

The Panama Hat , as suported by gentelmen like Humphrey Bogart and Harry Truman has quite a story behind it. The truth be told, the Panama hat does not actually come from Panama, but rather from the South American country of Ecuador. Manufacturing of the hat began in the 1600s, and two centuries later, Ecuador began to export […]

Read More...
Panama 980 E26

The Watermelon War

It might seem a farcical name, a tragic/comic incident, but the riot that came to be known as the Watermelon War, which cost some twenty lives, serves as a historical allegory for the frictions that accompanied the relationship that would first build a trans-isthmian railroad, then a transoceanic canal. The year was 1856, seven years after the California […]

Read More...
Panama 980 E24

Volcano El Valle

By John Bennett Fifty one miles West of Panama City, as the crow flies, there once roared a great volcano, formed by the subduction of the South American Nasca continental plate beneath the Caribbean Plate, where the Isthmus of Panama is perched upon. There are three plates colliding in Panama, the two already mentioned and a third […]

Read More...

Colon Free Zone

The second largest Free Zone after Hong Kong, started operations in 1948 by presidential decree. Nowadays, Colon Free Zone serves as a hub for international commercial activities, hosting more than 2500 companies, and generating around 19,167,000 million dollars in operations. If visiting the Free Zone as a tourist, you must know that retail sales are limited, highly supervised and regulated, and people can’t leave the […]

Read More...
IMG_1401

Fort San Lorenzo

Declared a world heritage site by UNESCO is one of the oldest Spaniard fortresses in America. Built in 1597, by King Phillip II of Spain, to strategically protect the mainland coasts as a consequence of many attacks from Pirate Francis Drake in the nearby regions, especially the towns of Nombre de Dios and Camino Real. During those days Panama served as a transit […]

Read More...

Dictionary of Panamanian Slang

Even the most fluid Spanish speakers have some new vocabulary to learn when arriving in a new country. The following is a collection of our favorite Panamanian slang terms. Once you know what they mean, you will be surprised at just how often they are used in everyday speech. Awebao (adj) From the root word ahuevado – egg-headed, it can […]

Read More...
IMG_3533

THE AMADOR CAUSEWAY: What lies beneath

By Asia Sherman Today, the Amador Causeway is lined with touristy restaurants, souvenir shops and jogging paths, but perhaps more intriguing is the history the Causeway traces and what lies beneath the islands it connects. Not so long ago, the 3.5-mile stretch was armed to the teeth and crawling with U.S. military personnel, protecting the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. Little […]

Read More...
Fachada2

Gran Hotel Bahia

Jose “Tito” Thomas remembers the Bocas del Toro of his childhood when its few hundred residents were on a first-name basis. “Everyone was like one big happy family,” Thomas reminisces. “People lived with their doors and windows open. Nobody would touch anything that didn’t belong them.” Long before the first backpackers and surfers discovered the Caribbean archipelago, he was riding the waves in a cayuco, a dugout canoe. Today, he is […]

Read More...